Austrian Quantum Simulator Infrastructure granted

In the Framework of the Quantum Austria Initiative a joint project from the University of Innsbruck and the TU Wien was awarded and starts at the beginning of 2023. The “Austrian Quantum Simulator Infrastructure” project with a total funding of about 3 Million Euros will greatly enhance the already existing quantum simulators in several labs in Innsbruck and Vienna and also help in the building up of new simulators. Quantum simulators are a very powerful tool to study complex quantum systems by mimicking their behaviour with a quantum system which is fully controllable. The project consortium combines a great variety of physical systems which are used as simulators, including solid-state systems, ultracold atoms and trapped ions. Our group is participating with our long-range interacting atoms inside an optical lattice and our Rydberg tweezer array experiment.

Revealing the topological nature of the bond order wave in a strongly correlated quantum system

Now published in PRR with collaborators from ICFO, Barcelona! In the recent years, great effort has been devoted toward the study of symmetry-protected topological phases. We show that the bond order wave (BOW) induced by frustration between competing couplings has a nontrivial topological sector in the presence of chiral symmetry. We reveal its topological nature by finding a nonzero string order correlator and a degenerate entanglement spectrum, and design a realistic experimental scheme involving magnetic atoms trapped in an optical lattice. The latter paves the way towards an efficient quantum simulation of topological phases in many-body quantum systems.

The paper can be accessed here: Phys. Rev. Research, and the pre-print here: arXiv

Determination of the scattering length of erbium atoms

Now published in PRA with collaborators from JILA, Boulder (Colorado, USA), we accurately determine the scattering length for the four bosonic erbium isotopes with highest abundance in the magnetic field range from 0G to 5G. We use the cross-dimensional thermalization technique and extract the scattering length by applying a fit of the complete Enskog equations of change and by utilizing an analytic formula for the so-called number of collisions per re-thermalization. We benchmark our results with the very accurate but experimentally more demanding lattice modulation spectroscopy, confirming the accuracy of our experimental protocol.

The paper can be accessed here: Phys. Rev. A, and the pre-print here: arXiv