Our Erbium MOT

Our Erbium MOT

we created our first MOT of Erbium atoms

Setting up the experiment

Setting up the experiment

View through the experiment into the atomic beam source

The team and the lab

The team and the lab

The team enjoying our new lab space

Optical tables in new lab

Optical tables in new lab

Our optical tables arrived an the new lab space

New lab space

New lab space

our empty new lab space before insertion of optical tables

T-REQS LAB

We are currently designing and building a new experimental apparatus to study highly excited Erbium atoms. For this, we will implement a Tweezer array for Rydberg atoms of Erbium for Quantum Simulation (T-REQS).

Using our strong experience from the ERBIUM and the RARE experiment, we will set up a similar apparatus exploiting a transversal cooling chamber, Zeeman-slower, and a main chamber with a 5-beam MOT. The main chamber will also feature a versatile electric-field control to provide precise control over the Rydberg atoms. Using a high-resolution objective, we will implement arbitrary arrays of optical tweezers to trap single atoms and study their behaviour when excited to Rydberg states.

Rydberg states in multi-electron atoms

Rydberg atoms are well-known for their exaggerated properties, especially their strong long-range interaction due to their extremely large dipole moment. In recent years, tremendous progress has been made, in both experimental as well as theoretical work, in studying their properties and first applications for quantum simulation. However, most of these studies concentrate on single- or two-electron systems like alkali, alkaline-earth or alkaline-earth-like atomic species. We will extent the studies to a new class of atomic complexity by investigating the multi-electron atom erbium.

Optical tweezer arrays

To control a number of atoms on the single-particle level, we will use strongly-focused laser beams, so-called optical tweezers, to trap single atoms at well-defined positions. Using a spatial light modulator, we can create arbitrary patterns of atoms. Using a sorting algorithm, deterministic filling with a high fidelity is possible. The rich electronic structure of erbium allows to implement different cooling schemes, which provides a perfect starting point for quantum simulations in this system.

Lab news
Our review on the quantum many-body physics in ultracold magnetic lanthanides is now published in Nature Physics!
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We have produced our first ultracold atomic cloud of erbium atoms in our new T-REQS lab!
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Francesca has been awarded the Cardinal Innitzer Prize for Natural Sciences 2021 last weekend in Vienna for her outstanding achievements in the field of ultracold quantum gases. Her pioneering work with lathanoid atoms has been internationally groundbreaking in this field.
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Applications have now opened for the Introductory Course on Ultracold Quantum Gases 2022 winter school. This will take place in Innsbruck between the 9th and 11th February 2022.
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Welcome to Samuel, who has joined the T-Reqs team as PhD Student
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Our team has made first observations of Erbium Rydberg levels in a hot atomic beam. Using a spectroscopy technique called electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) we have measured more than 550 highly excited states of Er166. Our results show how the unique properties of Erbium effect the Rydberg series and provide
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Lab Team

Jane
Jane



Francesca Ferlaino, Univ.-Prof. Dr.

Group Leader / PI

Mike
Mike



Manfred Mark, Dr.

Senior Scientist/ Research Assistant

John
John


Hagai Edri, Dr.

Post-Doc (T-REQS)

John
John



Julian Maloberti, MSc.

PhD Student
(T-REQS)

John
John



Amal El-Arrach , BSc.

Master student (T-REQS)